Status update

This is not exact­ly a now page, but I thought I would write up what I am doing at the moment since last report­ing on my sta­tus in my end-of-year report.

The major­i­ty of my work­days are spent doing free­lance design con­sult­ing. My pri­ma­ry gig has been through Eend at the Dutch Vic­tim Sup­port Foun­da­tion, where until very recent­ly I was part of a team build­ing online ser­vices. I helped out with prod­uct strat­e­gy, set­ting up a lean UX design process, and get­ting an inte­grat­ed agile design and devel­op­ment team up and run­ning. The first ser­vices are now ship­ping so it is time for me to move on, after 10 months of very grat­i­fy­ing work. I real­ly enjoy work­ing in the pub­lic sec­tor and I hope to be doing more of it in future.

So yes, this means I am avail­able and you can hire me to do strat­e­gy and design for soft­ware prod­ucts and ser­vices. Just send me an email.

Short­ly before the Dutch nation­al elec­tions of this year, Iskan­der and I gath­ered a group of fel­low tech work­ers under the ban­ner of “Tech Sol­i­dar­i­ty NL to dis­cuss the con­cern­ing lurch to the right in nation­al pol­i­tics and what our field can do about it. This has devel­oped into a small but active com­mu­ni­ty who gath­er month­ly to edu­cate our­selves and devel­op plans for col­lec­tive action. I am get­ting a huge boost out of this. Fig­ur­ing out how to be a left­ist in this day and age is not easy. The only way to do it is to prac­tice and for that reflec­tion with peers is invalu­able. Build­ing and facil­i­tat­ing a group like this is huge­ly edu­ca­tion­al too. I have learned a lot about how a com­mu­ni­ty is boot-strapped and nur­tured.

If you are in the Nether­lands, your pol­i­tics are left of cen­ter, and you work in tech­nol­o­gy, con­sid­er your­self invit­ed to join.

And final­ly, the last major thing on my plate is a con­tin­u­ing effort to secure a PhD posi­tion for myself. I am get­ting great sup­port from peo­ple at Delft Uni­ver­si­ty of Tech­nol­o­gy, in par­tic­u­lar Gerd Kortuem. I am focus­ing on inter­net of things prod­ucts that have fea­tures dri­ven by machine learn­ing. My ulti­mate aim is to devel­op pro­to­typ­ing tools for design and devel­op­ment teams that will help them cre­ate more inno­v­a­tive and more eth­i­cal solu­tions. The first step for this will be to con­duct field research inside com­pa­nies who are cre­at­ing such prod­ucts right now. So I am reach­ing out to peo­ple to see if I can secure a rea­son­able amount of poten­tial col­lab­o­ra­tors for this, which will go a long way in prov­ing the fea­si­bil­i­ty of my whole plan.

If you know of any com­pa­nies that devel­op con­sumer-fac­ing prod­ucts that have a con­nect­ed hard­ware com­po­nent and make use of machine learn­ing to dri­ve fea­tures, do let me know.

That’s about it. Free­lance UX con­sult­ing, left­ist tech-work­er organ­is­ing and design-for-machine-learn­ing research. Quite hap­py with that mix, real­ly.

Hybrid Writing for Conversational Interfaces’ workshop

On May 24 of this year, Niels ’t Hooft and myself ran a work­shop titled ‘Hybrid Writ­ing for Con­ver­sa­tion­al Inter­faces’ at TU Delft. Our aim was twofold: teach stu­dents about writ­ing char­ac­ters and dia­log, and teach them how to pro­to­type chat inter­faces.

We spent a day with rough­ly thir­ty indus­tri­al design stu­dents alter­nat­ing between bits of the­o­ry, writ­ing exer­cis­es, instruc­tions on how to use Twine (our pro­to­typ­ing tool of choice) and closed out with a small project and a show and tell.

I was very pleased to see pro­to­types with quite a high lev­el of com­plex­i­ty and sophis­ti­ca­tion at the end of the day. And through­out, I could tell stu­dents were enjoy­ing them­selves writ­ing and build­ing inter­ac­tive con­ver­sa­tions.

Here’s a rough out­line of how the work­shop was struc­tured.

  1. After briefly intro­duc­ing our­selves, Niels pre­sent­ed a mini-lec­ture on inter­ac­tive fic­tion. A high­light for me was a two-by-two of the ways in which fic­tion and soft­ware can inter­sect.

Four types of software-fiction hybrids

  1. I then took over and did a show and tell of the absolute basics of using Twine. Things like cre­at­ing pas­sages, link­ing them, cre­at­ing branch­es and test­ing and pub­lish­ing your sto­ry.
  2. The first exer­cise after this was for stu­dents to take what they just learned about Twine and try to cre­ate a very sim­ple inter­ac­tive sto­ry.
  3. After a cof­fee break, Niels then pre­sent­ed his sec­ond mini-lec­ture on the very basics of writ­ing. With a par­tic­u­lar focus on writ­ing char­ac­ters and dia­log. This includ­ed a handy cheat­sheet for things to con­sid­er while writ­ing.

A cheatsheet for writing dialog

  1. In our sec­ond exer­cise stu­dents worked in pairs. They first each cre­at­ed a char­ac­ter, which they then described to each oth­er. They then first planned out the struc­ture of an encounter between these two char­ac­ters. And final­ly they col­lab­o­ra­tive­ly wrote the dia­logue for this encounter. They were required to stick to Hol­ly­wood for­mat­ting. Niels and I then did a read­ing of a few (to great amuse­ment of all present) to close out the morn­ing sec­tion of the work­shop.
  2. After lunch Niels pre­sent­ed his third and final mini-lec­ture of the day, on con­ver­sa­tion­al inter­faces, rely­ing heav­i­ly on the great work of our friend Alper in his book on the sub­ject.
  3. I then took over for the sec­ond show and tell. Here we ramped up the chal­lenge and intro­duced the Twine Tex­ting Project – a frame­work for pro­to­typ­ing con­ver­sa­tion­al inter­faces in Twine. On GitHub, you can find the starter file I had pre­pared for this sec­tion.
  4. The third and final exer­cise of the day was for stu­dents to take what they learned about writ­ing dia­log, and pro­to­typ­ing chat inter­faces, and to build an inter­ac­tive pro­to­type of a con­ver­sa­tion­al inter­face or inter­ac­tive fic­tion in chat for­mat. They could either build off of the dia­log they have cre­at­ed in the pre­vi­ous exer­cise, or start from scratch.
  5. We fin­ished the day with demos, where put the Twine sto­ry on the big screen and as a group chose what options to select. After each demo the cre­ator would open up the Twine file and walk us through how they had built it. It was pret­ty cool to see how many stu­dents had put what they had learned to very cre­ative uses.

Reflect­ing on the work­shop after­wards, we felt the struc­ture was nice­ly bal­anced between the­o­ry and prac­tice. The dif­fi­cul­ty lev­el was such that stu­dents did learn some new things which they could incor­po­rate into future projects, but still built on skills they had already acquired. The choice for Twine worked out well too since it is high­ly acces­si­ble. Non-tech­ni­cal stu­dents man­aged to cre­ate some­thing inter­ac­tive, and more advanced stu­dents could apply what they knew about code to pro­duce more sophis­ti­cat­ed pro­to­types.

For future work­shops we did feel we could improve on build­ing a bridge between the writ­ing for inter­ac­tive fic­tion and writ­ing for con­ver­sa­tion­al inter­faces of soft­ware prod­ucts and ser­vices. This would require some adap­ta­tion of the mini lec­tures and a slight­ly dif­fer­ent empha­sis in the exer­cis­es. The key would be to have stu­dents imag­ine exist­ing prod­ucts and ser­vices as char­ac­ters, and to then write dia­log for inter­ac­tions and pro­to­type them. For a future iter­a­tion of the work­shop, this would be worth explor­ing fur­ther.

Many thanks to Ianus Keller for invit­ing us to teach this work­shop at IDE Acad­e­my.

Curiosity is our product

A few weeks ago I facil­i­tat­ed a dis­cus­sion on ‘advo­ca­cy in a post-truth era’ at the Euro­pean Dig­i­tal Rights Initiative’s annu­al gen­er­al assem­bly. And last night I was part of a dis­cus­sion on fake news at a behav­iour design meet­up in Ams­ter­dam. This was a good occa­sion to pull togeth­er some of my notes and fig­ure out what I think is true about the ‘fake news’ phe­nom­e­non.

There is plen­ty of good writ­ing out there explor­ing the his­to­ry and cur­rent state of post-truth polit­i­cal cul­ture.

Kellyanne Conway’s “alter­na­tive facts” and Michael Gove’s “I think peo­ple have had enough of experts” are just two exam­ples of the right’s appro­pri­a­tion of what I would call epis­te­mo­log­i­cal rel­a­tivism. Post-mod­ernism was fun while it worked to advance our left­ist agen­da. But now that the tables are turned we’re not enjoy­ing it quite as much any­more, are we?

Part of the fact-free pol­i­tics play­book goes back at least as far as big tobacco’s efforts to dis­cred­it the anti-smok­ing lob­by. “Doubt is our prod­uct” still applies to mod­ern day reac­tionary move­ments such as cli­mate change deniers and anti-vax­ers.

The dou­ble wham­my of news indus­try com­mer­cial­i­sa­tion and inter­net plat­form con­sol­i­da­tion has cre­at­ed fer­tile ground for coor­di­nat­ed efforts by var­i­ous groups to turn the sow­ing of doubt all the way up to eleven.

There is Russia’s “fire­hose of false­hood” which sends a high vol­ume of mes­sages across a wide range of chan­nels with total dis­re­gard for truth or even con­sis­ten­cy in a rapid, con­tin­u­ous and repet­i­tive fash­ion. They seem to be hav­ing fun desta­bil­is­ing west­ern democ­ra­cies — includ­ing the Nether­lands — with­out any appar­ent end-goal in mind.

And then there is the out­rage mar­ket­ing lever­aged by trolls both minor and major. Piss­ing off main­stream media builds an audi­ence on the fringes and in the under­ground. Jour­nal­ists are held hostage by fig­ures such as Milo because they depend on sto­ries that trig­ger strong emo­tions for dis­tri­b­u­tion, eye­balls, clicks and ulti­mate­ly rev­enue.

So, giv­en all of this, what is to be done? First some bad news. Facts, the weapon of choice for lib­er­als, don’t appear to work. This is empir­i­cal­ly evi­dent from recent events, but it also appears to be borne out by psy­chol­o­gy.

Facts are often more com­pli­cat­ed than the untruths they are sup­posed to counter. It is also eas­i­er to remem­ber a sim­ple lie than a com­pli­cat­ed truth. Com­pli­cat­ing mat­ters fur­ther, facts tend to be bor­ing. Final­ly, and most inter­est­ing­ly, there is some­thing called the ‘back­fire effect’: we become more entrenched in our views when con­front­ed with con­tra­dict­ing facts, because they are threat­en­ing to our group iden­ti­ties.

More bad news. Giv­en the speed at which false­hoods spread through our net­works, fact-check­ing is use­less. Fact-check­ing is after-the-fact-check­ing. Worse, when media fact-check false­hoods on their front pages they are sim­ply pro­vid­ing even more air­time to them. From a strate­gic per­spec­tive, when you debunk, you allow your­self to be cap­tured by your opponent’s frame, and you’re also on the defen­sive. In Boy­di­an terms you are caught in their OODA loop, when you should be work­ing to take back the ini­tia­tive, and you should be offer­ing an alter­na­tive nar­ra­tive.

I am not hope­ful main­stream media will save us from these dynam­ics giv­en the real­i­ties of the busi­ness mod­els they oper­ate inside of. Jour­nal­ists inside of these organ­i­sa­tions are typ­i­cal­ly over­worked, just hold­ing on for dear life and churn­ing out sto­ries at a rapid clip. In short, there is no time to ori­ent and manoeu­vre. For bad-faith actors, they are sit­ting ducks.

What about lit­er­a­cy? If only peo­ple knew about chur­nal­ism, the atten­tion econ­o­my, and fil­ter bub­bles ‘they’ would become immune to the lies ped­dled by reac­tionar­ies and return to the lib­er­al fold. Per­son­al­ly I find these claims high­ly uncon­vinc­ing not to men­tion con­de­scend­ing.

My cur­rent work­ing the­o­ry is that we, all of us, buy into the sto­ries that acti­vate one or more of our group iden­ti­ties, regard­less of wether they are fact-based or out­right lies. This is called ‘moti­vat­ed rea­son­ing’. Since this is a fact of psy­chol­o­gy, we are all sus­cep­ti­ble to it, includ­ing lib­er­als who are sup­pos­ed­ly defend­ers of fact-based rea­son­ing.

Seri­ous­ly though, what about lit­er­a­cy? I’m sor­ry, no. There is evi­dence that sci­en­tif­ic lit­er­a­cy actu­al­ly increas­es polar­i­sa­tion. Moti­vat­ed rea­son­ing trumps fac­tu­al knowl­edge you may have. The same research shows how­ev­er that curios­i­ty in turn trumps moti­vat­ed rea­son­ing. The way I under­stand the dis­tinc­tion between lit­er­a­cy and curios­i­ty is that the for­mer is about knowl­edge while the lat­ter is about atti­tude. Moti­vat­ed rea­son­ing isn’t coun­ter­act­ed by know­ing stuff, but by want­i­ng to know stuff.

This is a mixed bag. Offer­ing facts is com­par­a­tive­ly easy. Spark­ing curios­i­ty requires sto­ry­telling which in turn requires imag­i­na­tion. If we’re pre­sent­ed with a fact we are not invit­ed to ask ques­tions. How­ev­er, if we are pre­sent­ed with ques­tions and those ques­tions are wrapped up in sto­ries that cre­ate emo­tion­al stakes, some of the views we hold might be desta­bilised.

In oth­er words, if doubt is the prod­uct ped­dled by our oppo­nents, then we should start traf­fick­ing in curios­i­ty.

Further reading

Machine Learning for Designers’ workshop

On Wednes­day Péter Kun, Hol­ly Rob­bins and myself taught a one-day work­shop on machine learn­ing at Delft Uni­ver­si­ty of Tech­nol­o­gy. We had about thir­ty master’s stu­dents from the indus­tri­al design engi­neer­ing fac­ul­ty. The aim was to get them acquaint­ed with the tech­nol­o­gy through hands-on tin­ker­ing with the Wek­ina­tor as cen­tral teach­ing tool.

Photo credits: Holly Robbins
Pho­to cred­its: Hol­ly Rob­bins

Background

The rea­son­ing behind this work­shop is twofold.

On the one hand I expect design­ers will find them­selves work­ing on projects involv­ing machine learn­ing more and more often. The tech­nol­o­gy has cer­tain prop­er­ties that dif­fer from tra­di­tion­al soft­ware. Most impor­tant­ly, machine learn­ing is prob­a­bilis­tic in stead of deter­min­is­tic. It is impor­tant that design­ers under­stand this because oth­er­wise they are like­ly to make bad deci­sions about its appli­ca­tion.

The sec­ond rea­son is that I have a strong sense machine learn­ing can play a role in the aug­men­ta­tion of the design process itself. So-called intel­li­gent design tools could make design­ers more effi­cient and effec­tive. They could also enable the cre­ation of designs that would oth­er­wise be impos­si­ble or very hard to achieve.

The work­shop explored both ideas.

Photo credits: Holly Robbins
Pho­to cred­its: Hol­ly Rob­bins

Format

The struc­ture was rough­ly as fol­lows:

In the morn­ing we start­ed out pro­vid­ing a very broad intro­duc­tion to the tech­nol­o­gy. We talked about the very basic premise of (super­vised) learn­ing. Name­ly, pro­vid­ing exam­ples of inputs and desired out­puts and train­ing a mod­el based on those exam­ples. To make these con­cepts tan­gi­ble we then intro­duced the Wek­ina­tor and walked the stu­dents through get­ting it up and run­ning using basic exam­ples from the web­site. The final step was to invite them to explore alter­na­tive inputs and out­puts (such as game con­trollers and Arduino boards).

In the after­noon we pro­vid­ed a design brief, ask­ing the stu­dents to pro­to­type a data-enabled object with the set of tools they had acquired in the morn­ing. We assist­ed with tech­ni­cal hur­dles where nec­es­sary (of which there were more than a few) and closed out the day with demos and a group dis­cus­sion reflect­ing on their expe­ri­ences with the tech­nol­o­gy.

Photo credits: Holly Robbins
Pho­to cred­its: Hol­ly Rob­bins

Results

As I tweet­ed on the way home that evening, the results were… inter­est­ing.

Not all groups man­aged to put some­thing togeth­er in the admit­ted­ly short amount of time they were pro­vid­ed with. They were most often stymied by get­ting an Arduino to talk to the Wek­ina­tor. Max was often picked as a go-between because the Wek­ina­tor receives OSC mes­sages over UDP, where­as the quick­est way to get an Arduino to talk to a com­put­er is over ser­i­al. But Max in my expe­ri­ence is a fick­le beast and would more than once crap out on us.

The groups that did build some­thing main­ly assem­bled pro­to­types from the exam­ples on hand. Which is fine, but since we were main­ly work­ing with the exam­ples from the Wek­ina­tor web­site they tend­ed towards the inter­ac­tive instru­ment side of things. We were hop­ing for explo­rations of IoT prod­uct con­cepts. For that more hand-rolling was required and this was only achiev­able for the stu­dents on the high­er end of the tech­ni­cal exper­tise spec­trum (and the more tena­cious ones).

The dis­cus­sion yield­ed some inter­est­ing insights into men­tal mod­els of the tech­nol­o­gy and how they are affect­ed by hands-on expe­ri­ence. A com­ment I heard more than once was: Why is this con­sid­ered learn­ing at all? The Wek­ina­tor was not per­ceived to be learn­ing any­thing. When chal­lenged on this by reit­er­at­ing the under­ly­ing prin­ci­ples it became clear the black box nature of the Wek­ina­tor ham­pers appre­ci­a­tion of some of the very real achieve­ments of the tech­nol­o­gy. It seems (for our stu­dents at least) machine learn­ing is stuck in a grey area between too-high expec­ta­tions and too-low recog­ni­tion of its capa­bil­i­ties.

Next steps

These results, and oth­ers, point towards some obvi­ous improve­ments which can be made to the work­shop for­mat, and to teach­ing design stu­dents about machine learn­ing more broad­ly.

  1. We can improve the toolset so that some of the heavy lift­ing involved with get­ting the var­i­ous parts to talk to each oth­er is made eas­i­er and more reli­able.
  2. We can build exam­ples that are geared towards the prac­tice of design­ing IoT prod­ucts and are ready for adap­ta­tion and hack­ing.
  3. And final­ly, and prob­a­bly most chal­leng­ing­ly, we can make the work­ings of machine learn­ing more trans­par­ent so that it becomes eas­i­er to devel­op a feel for its capa­bil­i­ties and short­com­ings.

We do intend to improve and teach the work­shop again. If you’re inter­est­ed in host­ing one (either in an edu­ca­tion­al or pro­fes­sion­al con­text) let me know. And stay tuned for updates on this and oth­er efforts to get design­ers to work in a hands-on man­ner with machine learn­ing.

Spe­cial thanks to the bril­liant Ianus Keller for con­nect­ing me to Péter and for allow­ing us to pilot this crazy idea at IDE Acad­e­my.

References

Sources used dur­ing prepa­ra­tion and run­ning of the work­shop:

  • The Wek­ina­tor – the UI is infu­ri­at­ing­ly poor but when it comes to get­ting start­ed with machine learn­ing this tool is unmatched.
  • Arduino – I have become par­tic­u­lar­ly fond of the MKR1000 board. Add a lithi­um-poly­mer bat­tery and you have every­thing you need to pro­to­type IoT prod­ucts.
  • OSC for ArduinoCNMAT’s imple­men­ta­tion of the open sound con­trol (OSC) encod­ing. Key puz­zle piece for get­ting the above two tools talk­ing to each oth­er.
  • Machine Learn­ing for Design­ers – my pre­ferred intro­duc­tion to the tech­nol­o­gy from a design­er­ly per­spec­tive.
  • A Visu­al Intro­duc­tion to Machine Learn­ing – a very acces­si­ble visu­al expla­na­tion of the basic under­pin­nings of com­put­ers apply­ing sta­tis­ti­cal learn­ing.
  • Remote Con­trol Theremin – an exam­ple project I pre­pared for the work­shop demo­ing how to have the Wek­ina­tor talk to an Arduino MKR1000 with OSC over UDP.

Design × AI coffee meetup

If you work in the field of design or arti­fi­cial intel­li­gence and are inter­est­ed in explor­ing the oppor­tu­ni­ties at their inter­sec­tion, con­sid­er your­self invit­ed to an infor­mal cof­fee meet­up on Feb­ru­ary 15, 10am at Brix in Ams­ter­dam.

Erik van der Plui­jm and myself have for a while now been car­ry­ing on a con­ver­sa­tion about AI and design and we felt it was time to expand the cir­cle a bit. We are very curi­ous who else out there shares our excite­ment.

Ques­tions we are mulling over include: How does the design process change when cre­at­ing intel­li­gent prod­ucts? And: How can teams col­lab­o­rate with intel­li­gent design tools to solve prob­lems in new and inter­est­ing ways?

Any­way, lots to chew on.

No need to sign up or any­thing, just show up and we’ll see what hap­pens.

High-skill robots, low-skill workers

Some notes on what I think I under­stand about tech­nol­o­gy and inequal­i­ty.

Let’s start with an obvi­ous big ques­tion: is tech­nol­o­gy destroy­ing jobs faster than they can be replaced? On the long term the evi­dence isn’t strong. Humans always appear to invent new things to do. There is no rea­son this time around should be any dif­fer­ent.

But in the short term tech­nol­o­gy has con­tributed to an evap­o­ra­tion of mid-skilled jobs. Parts of these jobs are auto­mat­ed entire­ly, parts can be done by few­er peo­ple because of high­er pro­duc­tiv­i­ty gained from tech.

While pro­duc­tiv­i­ty con­tin­ues to grow, jobs are lag­ging behind. The year 2000 appears to have been a turn­ing point. “Some­thing” hap­pened around that time. But no-one knows exact­ly what.

My hunch is that we’ve seen an emer­gence of a new class of pseu­do-monop­o­lies. Oli­gop­o­lies. And this is com­pound­ed by a ‘win­ner takes all’ dynam­ic that tech­nol­o­gy seems to pro­duce.

Oth­ers have point­ed to glob­al­i­sa­tion but although this might be a con­tribut­ing fac­tor, the evi­dence does not sup­port the idea that it is the major cause.

So what are we left with?

His­tor­i­cal­ly, look­ing at pre­vi­ous tech­no­log­i­cal upsets, it appears edu­ca­tion makes a big dif­fer­ence. Peo­ple neg­a­tive­ly affect­ed by tech­no­log­i­cal progress should have access to good edu­ca­tion so that they have options. In the US the access to high qual­i­ty edu­ca­tion is not equal­ly divid­ed.

Appar­ent­ly fam­i­ly income is asso­ci­at­ed with edu­ca­tion­al achieve­ment. So if your fam­i­ly is rich, you are more like­ly to become a high skilled indi­vid­ual. And high skilled indi­vid­u­als are priv­i­leged by the tech econ­o­my.

And if Piketty’s is right, we are approach­ing a real­i­ty in which mon­ey made from wealth ris­es faster than wages. So there is a feed­back loop in place which only exac­er­bates the sit­u­a­tion.

One more bul­let: If you think trick­le-down eco­nom­ics, increas­ing the size of the pie will help, you might be mis­tak­en. It appears social mobil­i­ty is helped more by decreas­ing inequal­i­ty in the dis­tri­b­u­tion of income growth.

So some pre­lim­i­nary con­clu­sions: a pro­gres­sive tax on wealth won’t solve the issue. The edu­ca­tion sys­tem will require reform, too.

I think this is the cen­tral irony of the whole sit­u­a­tion: we are work­ing hard to teach machines how to learn. But we are neglect­ing to improve how peo­ple learn.

Move 37

Design­ers make choic­es. They should be able to pro­vide ratio­nales for those choic­es. (Although some­times they can’t.) Being able to explain the think­ing that went into a design move to your­self, your team­mates and clients is part of being a pro­fes­sion­al.

Move 37. This was the move Alpha­Go made which took every­one by sur­prise because it appeared so wrong at first.

The inter­est­ing thing is that in hind­sight it appeared Alpha­Go had good rea­sons for this move. Based on a cal­cu­la­tion of odds, basi­cal­ly.

If asked at the time, would Alpha­Go have been able to pro­vide this ratio­nale?

It’s a thing that pops up in a lot of the read­ing I am doing around AI. This idea of trans­paren­cy. In some fields you don’t just want an AI to pro­vide you with a deci­sion, but also with the argu­ments sup­port­ing that deci­sion. Obvi­ous exam­ples would include a sys­tem that helps diag­nose dis­ease. You want it to pro­vide more than just the diag­no­sis. Because if it turns out to be wrong, you want to be able to say why at the time you thought it was right. This is a social, cul­tur­al and also legal require­ment.

It’s inter­est­ing.

Although lives don’t depend on it, the same might apply to intel­li­gent design tools. If I am work­ing with a sys­tem and it is offer­ing me design direc­tions or solu­tions, I want to know why it is sug­gest­ing these things as well. Because my rea­son for pick­ing one over the oth­er depends not just on the sur­face lev­el prop­er­ties of the design but also the under­ly­ing rea­sons. It might be impor­tant because I need to be able to tell stake­hold­ers about it.

An added side effect of this is that a design­er work­ing with such a sys­tem is be exposed to machine rea­son­ing about design choic­es. This could inform their own future think­ing too.

Trans­par­ent AI might help peo­ple improve them­selves. A black box can’t teach you much about the craft it’s per­form­ing. Look­ing at out­comes can be inspi­ra­tional or help­ful, but the process­es that lead up to them can be equal­ly infor­ma­tive. If not more so.

Imag­ine work­ing with an intel­li­gent design tool and get­ting the equiv­a­lent of an Alpha­Go move 37 moment. Huge­ly inspi­ra­tional. Game chang­er.

This idea gets me much more excit­ed than automat­ing design tasks does.

Books I’ve read in 2016

I’ve read 32 books, which is four short of my goal and also four less than the pre­vi­ous year. It’s still not a bad score though and qual­i­ty wise the list below con­tains many gems.

I resolved to read most­ly books by women and minor­i­ty authors. This lead to quite a few sur­pris­ing expe­ri­ences which I am cer­tain­ly grate­ful for. I think I’ll con­tin­ue to push myself to seek out such books in the year to come.

There are only a few comics in the list. I sort of fell off the comics band­wag­on this year main­ly because I just can’t seem to find a good place to dis­cov­er things to read.

Any­way, here’s the list, with links to my reviews on Goodreads. A * denotes a par­tic­u­lar favourite.

Favourite music albums of 2016

I guess this year final­ly marked the end of my album lis­ten­ing behav­iour. Spotify’s Dis­cov­er and Dai­ly Mix fea­tures were the one-two punch that knocked it out. In addi­tion I some­how stopped scrob­bling to Last.fm in March. It’s switched back on now but the dam­age is done.

So the data I do have is incom­plete. I did still delib­er­ate­ly put on a num­ber of albums this year. But I won’t post them in order of lis­tens like I did last year. This is sub­jec­tive, unsort­ed and hand-picked. I will even sneak in a few albums that were pub­lished towards the end of 2015.

My sources includ­ed Pitchfork’s list of best new albums which used to be how I dis­cov­ered new music and still wields some influ­ence. I cross-ref­er­enced with Spotify’s top songs of 2016.

So first Spo­ti­fy tells me what to lis­ten to and then it gives me a list of things I actu­al­ly lis­tened to. This is get­ting weird…

Any­way, here they are. A * marks a par­tic­u­lar favourite.

  • A Tribe Called Quest – We Got It From Here… *
  • Solange – A Seat At the Table
  • Hamil­ton Lei­thauser + Ros­tam – I Had A Dream That You Were Mine
  • The Avalanch­es – Wild­flower *
  • Blood Orange – Free­town Sound
  • Whit­ney – Light Upon the Lake
  • Car Seat Head­rest – Teens Of Denial *
  • Chance The Rap­per – Col­or­ing Book *
  • ANOHNIHOPELESSNESS
  • Moody­mann – DJ-Kicks *
  • Grimes – Art Angels *
  • Float­ing Points – Elae­nia
  • The Range – Poten­tial *
  • Sepal­cure – Fold­ing Time
  • Jami­la Woods – HEAVN

Here’s a playlist which includes a cou­ple of more albums if you want to have a lis­ten.

A year of two crashes

A year ago today I was in Bali.

We spent the bet­ter part of Decem­ber 2015 there. It wasn’t real­ly a hol­i­day, but we weren’t real­ly work­ing either. I was wrap­ping up a few final Hub­bub things back then. But for the most part life was qui­et. Very qui­et. We would get up real­ly ear­ly. We would buy some veg­eta­bles and things from a lady who would dri­ve into town every morn­ing with a load from the mar­ket.

I’d swim, exer­cise, med­i­tate, have break­fast and do some work. Writ­ing and read­ing most­ly. By the end of the morn­ing we would cook lunch. The major meal of the day. In the after­noon we wouldn’t do much of any­thing because of the heat. Decem­ber is rainy sea­son in Bali and it gets incred­i­bly hot and humid. Towards dusk we would often take a walk. We would have an ear­ly light din­ner and enter­tain our­selves with the antics of tokay geck­os. We would turn in ear­ly.

Now I am writ­ing this back in our home in Utrecht. In many ways my life has returned to the way it was before that month in Bali. But in oth­er ways it has changed. I used to run a small agency and would be in the stu­dio almost every day. Now I am free­lanc­ing and I split my time between work­ing on site at clients, work­ing from home and meet­ing up with peo­ple in town. I enjoy the vari­ety.

I used to be in the busi­ness of design­ing games and play­things for learn­ing and oth­er pur­pos­es. Now I am back to my old voca­tion of inter­ac­tion design and in the­o­ry I can and work on any­thing.

Towards the end of Hubbub’s run I felt boxed in. Now I feel like I can pur­sue what­ev­er inter­ests me.

Right now, under the ban­ner of Eend I am help­ing the Dutch vic­tim sup­port foun­da­tion devel­op new dig­i­tal ser­vices. I spend about three days a week work­ing on site as part of cross-dis­ci­pli­nary agile team made up of a mix of inter­nal and exter­nal peo­ple. It’s good, impor­tant work and I can con­tribute a lot.

The time that remains I divide between the usu­al free­lancer things like admin, net­work­ing and so on, and devel­op­ing a plan for a PhD.

I’ve been blog­ging on and off about intel­li­gent design tools this year and that is no coin­ci­dence. I am con­sid­er­ing going into research full­time to work in that space. It is still ear­ly days but I am hav­ing fun read­ing up on the sub­ject, writ­ing, mak­ing plans, and talk­ing to peo­ple in acad­e­mia about it.

In between this ‘new nor­mal’ and those qui­et days in Bali was a year of two crash­es. I basi­cal­ly start­ed from scratch in many ways twice this year and I feel like it has helped me get reori­ent­ed.

Crash one.

In Jan­u­ary we moved to Sin­ga­pore. We would end up spend­ing sev­en months there. In that time I joined a start­up called ARTO. I helped build a team, devel­op a design and devel­op­ment process and act­ed as prod­uct man­ag­er and prod­uct design­er. We launched a first ver­sion of the prod­uct in that peri­od and we pushed out a cou­ple of new fea­tures as well. The last thing I did was find a replace­ment for myself.

In between work­ing on ARTO I taught a two-part engage­ment design work­shop with Michael and helped Edo and his team build ArtHit. I got into run­ning and ate my way through the abun­dance of amaz­ing food Sin­ga­pore has to offer.

Of all the things I enjoyed about Sin­ga­pore, its cos­mopoli­tanism has to be the absolute high­light. I worked with peo­ple from Myan­mar, Malaysia, Viet­nam and India. I made friends with peo­ple from many more places. Dis­cov­er­ing the things we have in com­mon and the things that set us apart was a con­tin­u­ous source of enjoy­ment.

And like that, just when we were get­ting set­tled and had got­ten into a rou­tine of sorts and start­ed to feel at home it was time to go back to the Nether­lands. (But not before spend­ing a cou­ple of weeks explor­ing Viet­nam and Cam­bo­dia. More great food and gor­geous sights.)

Crash two.

It is weird to have cul­ture shock in a town you’ve spent most of your life in but that was what it felt like for about the first month back in Utrecht. Sep­tem­ber felt very sim­i­lar to Jan­u­ary. I had no work and was net­work­ing like a mad­man and just play­ing the num­bers game. Hop­ing I would bump into some­thing. And of course, as it always does even­tu­al­ly, things worked out.

I con­sid­er myself blessed to be able to take these risks and more or less trust things will turn out okay. I know that if they don’t there are always peo­ple around me who will sup­port me if worse comes to worse.

2017 looks to be a year of more sta­bil­i­ty although one can nev­er be sure. World events as well as occur­rences in my per­son­al cir­cles this year have shown me once again there are no guar­an­tees in life.

But I plan to build on what I’ve start­ed these past few months and see where it takes me. It is time to shift from ori­ent­ing to decid­ing and act­ing. And for the fore­see­able future I plan to keep the cur­rent ‘sys­tem’ run­ning.

So no more crash­es for the time being. Although I am sure there will come a time when the need for it aris­es again.