Engagement design worksheets

Engagement design workshop at General Assembly Singapore

In June/July of this year I helped Michael Fillié teach two classes about engagement design at General Assembly Singapore. The first was theoretical and the second practical. For the practical class we created a couple of worksheets which participants used in groups to gradually build a design concept for a new product or product improvement aimed at long-term engagement. Below are the worksheets along with some notes on how to use them. I’m hoping they may be useful in your own practice.

A practical note: Each of these worksheets is designed to be printed on A1 paper. (Click on the images to get the PDFs.) We worked on them using post-it notes so that it is easy to add, change or remove things as you go.

Problem statement and persona

01-problem-statement-and-persona

We started with understanding the problem and the user. This worksheet is an adaptation of the persona sheet by Strategyzer. To use it you begin at the top, fleshing out the problem in the form of stating the engagement challenge, and the business goals. Then, you select a user segment which is relevant to the problem.

The middle section of the sheet is used to describe them in the form of a persona. Start with putting a face on them. Give the persona a name and add some demographic details relevant for the user’s behaviour. Then, move on to exploring what their environment looks and sounds like and what they are thinking and feeling. Finally, try to describe what issues the user is having that are addressed by the product and what the user stands to gain from using the product.

The third section of this sheet is used to wrap up the first exercise by doing a quick gap analysis of what the business would like to see in terms of user behaviour and what the user is currently doing. This will help pin down the engagement design concept fleshed out in the next exercises.

Engagement loop

02-engagement-loop

Exercise two builds on the understanding of the problem and the user and offers a structured way of thinking through a possible solution. For this we use the engagement loop model developed by Sebastian Deterding. There are different places we can start here but one that often works well is to start imagining the Big Hairy Audacious Goal the user is looking to achieve. This is the challenge. It is a thing (usually a skill) the user can improve at. Note this challenge down in the middle. Then, working around the challenge, describe a measurable goal the user can achieve on their way to mastering the challenge. Describe the action the user can take with the product towards that goal, and the feedback the product will give them to let them know their action has succeeded and how much closer it has gotten them to the goal. Finally and crucially, try to describe what kind of motivation the user is driven by and make sure the goals, actions and feedback make sense in that light. If not, adjust things until it all clicks.

Storyboard

03-storyboard

The final exercise is devoted to visualising and telling a story about the engagement loop we developed in the abstract in the previous block. It is a typical storyboard, but we have constrained it to a set of story beats you must hit to build a satisfying narrative. We go from introducing the user and their challenge, to how the product communicates the goal and action to what a user does with it and how they get feedback on that to (fast-forward) how they feel when they ultimately master the challenge. It makes the design concept relatable to outsiders and can serve as a jumping off point for further design and development.

Use, adapt and share

Together, these three exercises and worksheets are a great way to think through an engagement design problem. We used them for teaching but I can also imagine teams using them to explore a solution to a problem they might be having with an existing product, or as a way to kickstart the development of a new product.

We’ve built on other people’s work for these so it only makes sense to share them again for others to use and build on. If you do use them I would love to hear about your experiences.

Published by

Kars Alfrink

Kars is an independent interaction and game designer who makes things with technology for play, learning and creativity.